Business

Mast Shoes Marks 75th Anniversary

In 1942, Ann Arbor High School graduate Walter Mast struck out on his own and opened Mast Shoe Store on S. Main St. No sooner had Mr. Mast opened the store than Uncle Sam called and Helen Mast took over running the store while Walter served in World War II.

In 1949 Mast Shoes added a Campus store on Liberty with elegant departments for women and men. Their stores featured the latest styles in sandals, winter boots, trendy boots, and top brands for men.

In 1968 the flagship store moved down to 217 S. Main and re-opened with much larger display areas. The Westgate store opened in 1993. In 1997, Tom and Greg Mast made the tough decision to close the Main Street store. In 2004, the Masts closed the Liberty St. store, concentrating their business to Westgate. Stop by Westgate and see the display of vintage photos they've put in the store to celebrate their 75th anniversary.

Record Store Day Film Screening And Discussion: All Things Must Pass: The Rise and Fall of Tower Records

Wrap up your Record Store Day spree at your library with a screening of All Things Must Pass: The Rise and Fall of Tower Records.

Established in 1960, Tower Records was once a retail powerhouse with two hundred stores, in thirty countries, on five continents and eventually became the heart and soul of the music world, and a powerful force in the music industry. In 1999, Tower Records made $1 billion. In 2006, the company filed for bankruptcy. What went wrong?

"All Things Must Pass" is an examination of this iconic company's explosive trajectory, tragic demise, and legacy forged by its rebellious founder Russ Solomon. Find out the inside story of this music industry powerhouse with this acclaimed 2015 documentary, which is not rated.

This event will begin with a discussion and memories of Tower Records by several former store employees at 3:00 pm and will be followed by the film screening at 4:00 pm. While you're here, check out the launch of AADL's circulating vinyl collection and try out some of our tools for making your own music!

Where's It Hanging: Marketing Your Art

Artist? Graphic designer? Photographer? Videographer? Want to sell your art?

Have you shown at art fairs and events—talking to seemingly interested buyers—and then selling fewer pieces than anticipated? This interactive workshop will offer tips to help your work find a warm and loving home and a guided discussion on tactics that work.

Artists can use this workshop to brush up on approaching their art marketing like the business it is. The key to any business is to get customers and, if possible, repeat customers. The purpose of this workshop is to get artists to do what other businesses do to get customers—market the product so you can sell it!

This workshop will be led by Steve Feinman, District Director for SCORE (Service Corps of Retired Executives), serving Michigan and Northwest Ohio, with 300+ volunteers who provide mentoring and coaching for small business owners. Steve also develops and conducts workshops on topics that include fine art marketing, strategic marketing and sales, and business model canvases. In 2015, Steve was named Small Business Counselor of the Year by the SBA Michigan District Office. Steve has been an avid interest in fine arts and literature. He has been active in the fine arts community in Philadelphia, Maryland, and New Orleans. His specialty is art industry economics and policy.

Old News Way Back Day: December 17, 1935

This month Old News travels back 80 years to December 17, 1935. Local news dominated the front page that day with the major announcement of the merger of three banks, Ann Arbor Savings Bank, the Farmers and Mechanics Bank, and First National Bank and Trust Co. The merger, in the middle of the Great Depression, was seen as reassuring move in an otherwise shaky banking industry. Economic conditions dominated other local news as the Ann Arbor Public School announced federal funding for nursery schools and adult education. The WPA plan for a "practice house" where girls from relief families would be trained as housemaids was also unveiled. Even the Letters to the Editor were concerned with the Depression as a citizen called on neighbors to drop their opposition to a home for orphan children in the 7th ward. Perhaps related to the dire economic conditions (or not), the Courts took up the case of the stolen hog.

Many of the holiday traditions familiar to Ann Arborites took center stage in 1935. A front page article predicted that thousands would listen to the University Choral Union's Messiah at Hill Auditorium. The Community Sing, begun in 1931, was promoted with a full-page display complete with lyrics to all the favorite Christmas songs for the expected 10,000 carolers. The University of Michigan's Subscription Dance was becoming so popular organizers had to limit ticket sales. The local schools were not to be outdone with the Tappan School students putting on a production of Dicken's Christmas Carol. Check out the list of players and you may recognize a Townie. The annual Yule Lighting Contest deadline was extended to give citizens plenty of time to decorate their yards.

Amateur sports were big, really big, in 1935. Amateur boxing nights at the Armory drew big crowds and prominent coverage in the News. Mill Marsh, the News sports columnist, mused on the growing popularity of Wolverine hockey and basketball. Intrepid wrestling coach Cliff Keen regaled the Ann Arbor Kiwanis with a description of the drama of Big Ten conference matches.

So what kind of routine news would you find in the Ann Arbor Daily News in 1935? Plenty. Birthdays were celebrated, marriage license announced, deaths noted, weather data recorded, and the ever-present promotional contests, with readers competing for prizes with funny verses. Readers looked to the radio listings for their favorite programs and the theater ads for the latest films from Hollywood.

Much has changed in Ann Arbor in 80 years but it's amazing to note how many business are still around. Moe Sport Shop, celebrating 100 years in 2015, had a gorgeous display ad to tempt holiday shoppers. Kroger Co. gave cooks a list of the most-needed holiday items. Arbor Springs reminded readers to stock up on water for the holiday dinners. Stay tuned to Old News for more Way Back Days.

Finding Wholesale Happiness in a Retail World With Jeff Yeager, NBC Today Show's "Ultimate Cheapskate"

For this humor-filled presentation, Jeff will disclose how to live a happier, healthier, and fuller life …. but only if you’re NOT willing to pay the price. Based on his bestselling book, The Ultimate Cheapskate’s Road Map to True Riches: A Practical (and Fun) Guide to Enjoying Life More by Spending Less, this event will cover everything from how to decide what “enough” is for you (slaying your Enoughasaurus ) to tips for inoculating yourself against buyer’s remorse.

Yeager contends that for many Americans, the quality of their lives will increase and they’ll be happier if they spend and consume less, not more, as 5,000 commercial messages a day encourage us to do. A “cheapskate,” according to Yeager’s philosophy of life, is the polar opposite of a “conspicuous consumer.” Yeager encourages us to “Value time, and the things you can do with it, more than money, and the stuff you can buy with it.”

Jeff Yeager spent 24 years as a CEO and senior executive managing national nonprofit organizations in Washington, DC before launching his current career as a freelance writer, public speaker, and media personality in 2004. He specializes in an offbeat blend of original humor and practical advice for living a better life by spending and consuming less. He is AARP’s official Savings Expert, writing for AARP’s publications and hosting a weekly web show on YouTube — The Cheap Life — produced by AARP. He has also appeared on over 500 radio and TV shows on most major networks, and was an original cast member on TLC’s hit reality show Extreme Cheapskates.

He is the author of four popular books about frugal living, including his most recent, How to Retire the Cheapskate Way. This event includes a book signing and books will be for sale.

Getting the "YES" with Body Language

Join Clinical Psychologist Janette Ghedotte as she discusses the power of body language and how to create strategies to help establish rapport, decode body language messages and gain greater confidence in business and personal relationships.

Middle Earth Rotates Out of the University Scene: AADL Talks To Owner Cynthia Shevel

Long, long ago in a galaxy known as the '60s, Ann Arbor's first head shop, Middle Earth , opened in a 2nd floor walkup on Liberty Street and then moved to its iconic location on South U.

Owner Cynthia Shevel sat down with Old News last year to talk about the history of Middle Earth, how it changed over the years and the challenges independent shops face in Tree Town.

Cynthia announced the closing of Middle Earth yesterday saying that with the closing of the Selo/Shevel Gallery a few months back, she and longtime partner Elaine Selo will begin a new phase of their lives.

Falling Water Books & Collectibles to Close

Falling Water on AshleyFalling Water on Ashley

The owners of one of Ann Arbor's signature stores, Falling Water Books & Collectibles, just announced they will be closing after 26 years. Here's a 1988 article and photograph (left) from the store's grand opening in July of that year. Falling Water was first located at 318 S. Ashley St., and later moved to Main St.

Ten Thousand Villages And The Fair Trade Movement

Did you know that the global fair trade movement began with the founding of Ten Thousand Villages more than 60 years ago? Pioneering businesswoman Edna Ruth Byler was struck by the overwhelming poverty she witnessed during a 1946 trip to Puerto Rico and was moved to take action. She ignited a global movement to eradicate poverty through market-based solutions. For the next 30 years, Byler worked tirelessly to connect entrepreneurs in developing countries with market opportunities in North America. From humble beginnings, Ten Thousand Villages has now grown to a global network of social entrepreneurs working to empower and provide economic opportunities to artisans in developing countries.

Come meet Bill Henderson, store manager, and founding member Norene Kanagy. They will share fair trade principles, the history, and mission and tell the local history of the formation of the Ten Thousand Villages store at 303 S. Main St., Ann Arbor.

Belief, Hope and Generosity in the Workplace: Hiring Individuals in Recovery

Ari Weinzweig believes that a key aspect of managing ourselves is acknowledging the power of belief - and how much, whether we realize it or not, our beliefs impact our lives and our futures.

In this talk, the CEO and co-founding partner of Zingerman's Community of Businesses will take a look at how our beliefs play out in our day to day workplace experiences and how we and our workplaces are impacted by our beliefs. Ari will discuss how our beliefs about ourselves, organization, coworkers, and our boss, affect the work that we do. And also how, wittingly or unwittingly, we go to great lengths to reinforce our beliefs.

Weinzweig has been distilling the lessons learned from that journey into a series of what will eventually be 6 books. The third, and most recent of the Zingerman’s Guide to Good Leading series, "A Lapsed Anarchist's Approach to Managing Ourselves," turns inwards and examines the impact that our selves have on our businesses.

This event includes a book signing and books will be for sale.

This lecture is in partnership with U-M Council for Disability Concerns 2014 Investing in Ability Week theme Addiction as Disability. This event was originally scheduled for the Downtown Library Multi-Purpose Room and has been relocated to the 4th floor of the Downtown Library.

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