University of Michigan

International Families: Communicating Across Generations, Cultural Norms, and World Views

Join us for a panel discussion on issues facing international families, covering intergenerational communication, differing cultural norms and world views, domestic issues and violence, and access to services on campus and in the community.

Panelists include representatives from the Michigan Asian Pacific American Affairs Commission (MAPAAC), Mai Family Services, the Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center (SAPAC), and U-M Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS). A round table discussion will follow the panel presentation.

This event is a partnership with the Michigan Asian Pacific American Affairs Commission (MAPAAC).

View Points

Paintings in various media from the UM Faculty Women’s Club Painting Section

This fifth annual exhibition at the Mallets Creek Library features paintings from the Painting Section members of the University of Michigan’s Faculty Women’s Club, covering a large variety of styles and media. Each artist represents her own unique “View Point” on what she sees in the world.

The group started in 1929, creating award winning pieces. The artists learn from each other at weekly paint gatherings in their homes. Shows of their works have been displayed for the past 45 years at venues in the greater Ann Arbor area, including art fairs, UM art galleries, banks, churches, and libraries.

The members of this group strive to enrich the cultural life of the Ann Arbor area by raising awareness of, and by encouraging active participation in, the visual arts.

Bright Nights Community Forum: Borderline Personality Disorder, Debunking Myths, and Improving Hope

Borderline Personality Disorder is a serious mental illness, but one that is sometimes not well understood by patients and families, clinicians, and society as a whole. It is perhaps the most stigmatized disorder in all of medicine, which creates confusion, poor outcomes, and a sense of hopelessness for everyone involved.

Borderline Personality Disorder affects an estimated 18 million Americans during their lifetimes, and causes numerous stressful symptoms, including unstable mood, suicidal and self-harm thoughts and behaviors, and chaotic relationships. While the disorder causes great distress, treatment varies widely and research is lacking.

To learn more about Borderline Personality Disorder, the University of Michigan Depression Center and the Ann Arbor District Library will present this Bright Nights community forum. Victor Hong, MD, Clinical Instructor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan will give a brief presentation on Borderline Personality Disorder and its management, followed by a panel discussion.

Recent research indicates that the prognosis for those with Borderline Personality Disorder is much better than previously thought, and existing and emerging treatments have demonstrated significant efficacy. The role of medications in those treatments has been further elucidated, the role of families has been made clear, and a better understanding of how to manage safety concerns has developed

This event is a partnership with the University of Michigan Depression Center. For more information about the Depression Center, visit depressioncenter.org or contact Stephanie Salazar, 232-0330, or sawaters@umich.edu.

UMjobs.org

Join a specialist from the University of Michigan Human Resources office to learn how to search and apply for jobs at U-M.

For more information and resources on applying for jobs, check out AADL's Job Search Toolkit!

UMjobs.org

Join a specialist from the University of Michigan Human Resources office to learn how to search and apply for jobs at U-M.

For more information and resources on applying for jobs, check out AADL's Job Search Toolkit!

Hugo Reichard and the Campus Radicals of 1940

Hugo Reichard

We recently stumbled upon an envelope of Ann Arbor News photo negatives from September 1940 titled “Radical Demonstration on Behalf of Dismissed Student Reinhardt," which eventually led to information on the student in question (including the correct spelling of the name): Hugo Reichard. It turns out that Reichard, along with several writers for the student-run Michigan Daily and members of the campus left-leaning American Student Union (ASU) had been ousted by U-M President Alexander G. Ruthven for “radical” and “fifth-column" activities following an April peace rally on campus - a decision that caused considerable controversy among faculty and students that year.

In November, two months after the photographs were taken, an “open hearing” on behalf of the dismissed students, sponsored by the Michigan Civil Rights Federation and the Michigan Committee for Academic Freedom, took place off campus in Ann Arbor’s Island Park. Roughly 500 people - including students, faculty, and family members - attended, where lawyers and members of the UAW-CIO excoriated Ruthven’s decision as a violation of the students' civil rights. The Ann Arbor News briefly covered the event in two articles, “Protest meeting is held at park” and “Father upsets ouster trial,” and further weighed in with an editorial on the hearing organizers' brazen use of "Marxist techniques."

Meanwhile, Ruthven defended his position in a speech in Chicago, where he advised administrative officers and professors of colleges and universities to "rid themselves of the notion that romanticism, sentimentalism, and indiscriminate tolerance are essential constituents of democracy." And on Friday, November 16, several former Michigan Daily writers, now leading newspapermen around the country, voiced their opinions on the matter during the Daily’s 50th anniversary dinner held at the Michigan Union.

With World War II raging in Europe and the United States not yet committed, these were indeed interesting times. For more on this controversial moment in U-M's history, read the 2015 article "The Doves of 1940" in Michigan Today by James Tobin.

Thomas E. Dewey Visits His Alma Mater

thomas e. dewey

Crusading district attorney, governor of New York and two-time Republican nominee for president Thomas E. Dewey was a 1923 graduate of the University of Michigan with a soft spot in his heart for his alma mater. In July 1947, Dewey came with his wife Frances Hutt Dewey, and their two sons, Tom Jr. and John, to visit the campus and town. It was the year before his second run the presidency in 1948. Dewey suggested that the trip was to show his school to his 14-year-old Tom Jr., "a prospective student." He and his family met with UM President Alexander Ruthven, received a tour of the campus, including the Student Union, the office of the Michigan Daily and marveled at the growth of the school and town since he was an undergraduate.

At Michigan, Dewey was active on campus. He was editor of the Michigan Daily and performed in the campus choir. A photo from 1921 shows Dewey dressed as leprechaun for campus production of "Top of the Mornin'". He gave up a career in music for the law, attending Columbia University Law School. In 1956, Dewey returned again to UM campus to attend a meeting of Ann Arbor Republicans, meet with campus Young Republicans and promote the campaign of incumbent GOP President Dwight Eisenhower. Dewey was the first UM graduate to run for president of the United States. He was nominated in 1944 to run against incumbent President Franklin D. Roosevelt and in 1948 to run against incumbent Harry Truman. In 1958 the UM Board of Regents gave Dewey an award for Outstanding Achievement. Dewey was a native of Owosso, Mich.

Football Fan Craft Zone!

Go glue! Make your own wearable crafts in maize and blue to show your team spirit!

The University of Michigan Zoo

Wolverine

If you were in Ann Arbor between 1929 and 1962, you had the opportunity to visit the University of Michigan Zoo. On October 11, 1929, an article in the Michigan Daily said the zoo would open “in about three weeks” and would boast a weather vane by famed UM sculptor Carleton Angell. A December 11, 1929 Michigan Daily article reports animals moved in "last week". The tiny zoo enclosure was constructed behind the Alexander G. Ruthven Museums Building, what most of us think of as U of M's Natural History Museum. (The giant pumas that guard the front doors of the Natural History Museum were sculpted by Carleton Angell too!)

Inside today's museum is a memorial to the zoo which explains "...In 1929, a University of Michigan alumnus anonymously offered a collection of live native Michigan animals. It was the donor's hope that the animals could be enjoyed by children staying in the hospital then located across the street. A circular animal house and pond known as the "Museum Zoological Park" were constructed behind the Museums Building." Old news articles and photos show zoo residents like badgers, a bobcat, red foxes, skunks, otters, raccoons, several pairs of black bears throughout the years, and a wolverine named Biff. At some point a "reptile pit" was added, which included snakes and turtles.

In 1938, elaborate plans surfaced for a forty acre zoological garden to be located near the University of Michigan hospital. A WPA grant was "expected to provide the finances" for a wildlife utopia, where animals of the tiny U of M Zoo would be turned loose to live with no cages. The location of this dream zoo, which never came to fruition, seems to be the edge of what is now Nichols Arboretum.

Despite the popularity of the U of M Zoo, it was torn down in 1962 to make room for an addition to the Ruthven Museums Building. A few Ann Arbor City Council members, as well as many Ann Arbor townspeople, appealed to the University Board of Regents to save and/or relocate the beloved 30something year old zoo, but eventually the animals were relocated and the zoo became a memory. By today's zoological standards, the animals of Ann Arbor lived in fairly terrible, tiny, cramped quarters. The "Animal House", as it came to be called, never grew to be a wildlife utopia, but certainly provided countless Ann Arbor children and their families the opportunity to appreciate Michigan wildlife up close.

Anything Goes in A2

This fourth annual exhibition at the Mallets Creek Library features thirty-five square paintings from the Painting Section members of the University of Michigan’s Faculty Women’s Club (FWC) covering a large variety of styles and media.

The group started in 1929. The artists learn from each other at weekly paint gatherings in their homes. Shows of their works have been displayed for the past 45 years at venues in the greater Ann Arbor area, including art fairs, UM art galleries, banks, churches, libraries, and more.

The members of this group strive to enrich the cultural life of the Ann Arbor area by raising awareness of and encouraging active participation in the visual arts.

Syndicate content